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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
government will be working as closely as possible with the state and local officials, and we will not quit until this is done. we are not going to tolerate red tape. we're not going to tolerate bureaucracy. and i've instituted a 15-minute rule essentially on my team, you return everybody's phone calls in 15 minutes. whether it's the mayors, the governors, county officials. if they need something, we figure out a way to say yes. >> and the president of the united states and i have now had six conversations since sunday. that shows to me a level of caring and concern and interest that i think a leader should be giving to this type of situation. this was as comfortable and relaxing an interaction i've had with the president since i've known him. and i think it's because we're both doing what we want to do, which is to get things done. there will be some folks who will criticize me for complimenting him. you know what? i speak the truth. that's what i always do. sometimes you guys like it. sometimes you don't. sometimes politicians like it. sometimes they don't. but i say what i feel and what
of settle on the big question, how much government are we going to have, and how are we going to pay for it, then a lot of the other stuff falls into place. >> can you get medicare done? >> i think we can. >> because republicans demagogue it. democrats demagogue it. everybody's demagogued it through the years. can you go to the republicans and say, guys, we've got to do this together. >> well, here's what we can do. look, i'm on record, i think turning it into a voucher is a bad idea. i do think, though, that anybody realistically looks at it and says, if we're spending 17% of our gdp on health care and every other country's spending 11% and their outcomes are better, that difference is 6%, that's our deficit and our debt. and so let's find good ideas -- now, i stole a whole bunch of ideas from a massachusetts governor that i think over time is going to save us money. the $716 billion that governor romney suggests i stole from medicare actually is money that we are saving in the system and extending the life of medicare. so i think there are ways we can do this in a creative way. but if we
is for the government has a part to play, but individuals have a part to play, too. you've got to be working together so when people -- some of these people, obviously, their pain is genuine and totally understandable. but some of these people did, you know, were told to leave and didn't leave. and you understand why they didn't. it makes sense in human terms, but, you know, there is a responsibility that you have for yourself in addition to what the government obviously has for you. and again, if both sides are woaren't working together, that's when things fall apart. >> the person talking about they're pulling bodies out of water, the economy has to keep going, and there is potentially, meacham, some sort of symbolism as well. they're grappling with that in other towns and communities up and down the east coast are probably dealing with similar types of decisions as they try and move on. >> it's phenomenally complicated. >> really complicated. >> at what point do you show you're strong, restill yebzisil. >> no better way. >> the debate about what should be done after the attacks 11 years ago. it was t
? a little bit for everybody. all right. now, okay, "new york times." a big storm requires big government. disaster coordination is one of the most vital functions of big government, which is why mitt romney wants to eliminate it. at a republican primary debate last year, mr. romney was asked whether emergency management was a function that should be returned to the states. he not only agreed, he went further. mr. romney not only believes that states acting independently can handle the response to a vast east coast storm better than washington, but that companies can do an even better job. he said it was immoral for the federal government to do all these things if it means increasing the debt. many don't like the idea of free aid for poor people or think people should pay for their bad decisions, which this week includes living on the east coast. >> what do you want me to say? >> nothing. i really don't want you to say anything. >> no, i want to say something. >> okay. go ahead and say something. >> that's absolutely ridiculous. >> okay. >> i think what mitt romney is absolutely ridiculou
by policy and governance and by politics the week out from an election. we've heard you guys on the show the last couple days where this is a place where good government rhymes with good politics. it's not trying to elbow its way into new york at the statue of liberty. they're saying hey, you guys want us to come? we'll be there. governor christie thinks it's good for his state. he doesn't want a political backdrop either. but he wants to get help for the people of his state. mayor bloomberg has been obviously disappointed with obama, but also disagreed with romney on almost everything and has been public on both fronts. i think mayor bloomberg is focused, as jim suggested, on trying to get the city lit up and online and maybe it's more of a pain to have the president logistically than anything else. >> that may be true. >> i think you muddied things up. >> really? >> i'm not sure that people that are watching -- >> i've muddied things up. >> -- don't think that i believe the president's -- >> no. >> no, but you muddied things up, so now people are thinking that i think that. we're talki
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)